Over the years the conversation within the creative realm, especially around design, has blurred as the industry reaches to explain the differences between the capabilities, process, and expectations of design. Our work has transformed further with the growth of digital technology. Today, we can we do anything we dream up. Fantasy is now reality. With this in mind, companies are looking for inventive ways to differentiate themselves from equally digitally savvy competition.

 

The latest trend is an emphasis on Customer Experience -- which we define as the relationship between an organization and its customers throughout the relationship lifecycle, delivering on the individual’s expectations in each moment of the journey.

Moments can be classified as an interaction with a product, the look of the application, or even a conversation with a call center representative. Basically, any direct or indirect communication with an organization will define how the customer experience is delivered.

Now, how do you design for a better Customer Experience? The design industry has aesthetics, interactions, experiences, and services -- typically conflated to align with job postings, client request, and the like. However, as a product of craft, it is critical first to recognize their functional differences.

  • Interaction Design is the detailed design of how users interact with a single touchpoint comprised of features.
  • Experience Design is the combination of interactions across multiple touch-points within a user’s journey.
  • Visual Design is the balance between aesthetic elements, aimed towards improving/enhancing the brand, and guiding users through the experience.
  • Service Design is the strategic connection of experiences across user journeys to create seamless user transitions.

Each design practice has its own set of research activities and methods to achieve its stated goal. Each holds a valuable and necessary place in the design process to be successful. One practice cannot replace the other. However, when stacked together they become an unbreakable offering for the Customer Experience.

Still with me? Hopefully, we’ve clarified some of the structure for success.

Service Design is so much more than a buzzword though. Lately, it’s been defined as a method of design-thinking, an activity to sell-in a better Customer Experience, or a process to showcase the connection between an experience and backend technologies. Designers might say it’s the combination of these things plus so much more.

In our view, Service Design looks at the entire ecosystem of an organization, both front and backstage interaction points, across the lifecycle of the Customer Experience. Having a clear view of the entire operation that makes up the organization and everyone involved will allow a design team to ideate against opportunity spaces and create a one-of-a-kind service.

Service Design isn’t exclusively digital either. Most services will have an element of both physical or human interactions. Digital can be the connection between the customer and these experiences. Below are some reasons companies should leverage service design and the methods to support it:

  • Bridge the gap between the silos. Often, organizations aren't considering how an experience fits into the current-state journey and affects others who deliver on the service. Other times, it can showcase what’s currently being worked on, successes and failures, and even possible obstacles.
  • Design together by being together. When running workshops, bringing people together from across the organization allows them not only to learn from each other, but more importantly to meet for the first time, put a face to a voice, and form relationships IRL. Additionally, working together increases the speed of delivery since everyone is on the same wavelength (and timezone).
  • A helpful tool to popularize. Being able to view how future experiences work in harmony with both the current and future state of a service showcases the impact and projected results -- arming clients with the information to demonstrate the potential of the service.

Now that we have a shared understanding of what Service Design is and why to use it, let's talk about what it takes to execute.

McDonald’s Big Mac has its’ special sauce. Coca-Cola Classic has its’ secret recipe. Service Design has blueprints. To illustrate, designers use the method of service blueprinting to document the findings and propose suggestions as well as concepts to support the conclusions. Service blueprinting is just one method of many in a designer’s toolbox. However, when combined with the right design research activities, ongoing collaboration, and sound methodologies, I’d argue it’s the most useful artifact a design team can produce.

A service blueprint is the combination of experiences that explores the relationships between business goals, emotions, mindsets, pain points, touch points, and technology ultimately creating a holistic view of the current system and a shared vision of the future. This future vision aims to showcase every experience needed to deliver on the service that meets, and exceeds, the demands of the users.

Think of it as professional sports. Consider the relationship of fans watching a game and all that goes into making it happen. The players, coaches, field, uniforms, announcer, and Jumbotron are all considered the front stage. This is the first-hand experience of the fan.

The professional league, team’s owner and front-office, athletic trainers and team personnel, venue staff and vendors, camera guy for the kiss cam, etc. could be considered backstage in that they all are critical to the experience of that fan but might not be a primary interaction.

However, there’s a lot more that goes into making the event unique and might be considered more important to the fan’s experience or even than the game itself. Service Design requires investigation and consideration from the moment this person became a fan of the team. Explore the implications of the fan’s decision to purchase a ticket to this particular game and who’s else is attending. Suggest how the fan will get to and from the game and all the activities done before kickoff. Allow the fan to have quicker entry into the venue. Help the fan make the right choice on what to eat. This doesn’t stop at the end of the game either. By delivering a better customer experience the fan will have a reason to keep coming back and will tell all their friends about the experience.

This comprehensive view of the future is critical for organizations to align across leadership, business functions, and technology stakeholders setting a solid foundation to work towards collectively.

With all this said, service design and the method of blueprinting is not required for every client. If the client is expecting a defined solution from a blueprint, they may be sadly disappointed. What the client will get is a series of validated concepts that their organization can deliver against for the foreseeable future -- each with moments that deliver against all user demands and expectations. When the client starts to implement a blueprint, remind them of the importance of experience design and the research methods used. It’s not another round of research, going deep into that particular experience to understand specifics.

Clearly, defining the client request will direct you as to whether service design and blueprinting is the right practice to leverage. Service design is built around the value in research and the knowledge gained. Trust in the findings and insights is hard however. It can lead to some pretty tough conversations with organizations around misalignments, conflicts of interest, and weak links on a team. If not everyone is on board, it’s not going to be a fun time.

Everything in design has its place and purpose. You’re not going eat McDonald’s for an anniversary dinner nor will you mix Coca-Cola with a nice glass of bourbon.

One thing to remember:  A service blueprint is just a glimpse into the future and needs to be treated as a living document that can be revisioned, changed, and expanded on. Technology changes everyday in ways that can help to deliver more unexpected and delightful moments to users. The need to adapt accordingly must be baked into the service blueprint.

With the foundation set, it’s much easier to make decisions on how to approach new initiatives. If done correctly, the service blueprint will showcase gaps, both high and low, in the current service, and beyond the proposed solutions, to produce a long-term roadmap outlining the opportunity and timeframe needed for success.